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Solution for hair mite which lives in human hair follicles!

 

Most individuals with thin-looking hair have hair mites living in their hair and on their skin. These microscopic parasites may be linked to thinning hair, acne, and other skin conditions.

Many people don't like the idea of parasites living in their hair or on their skin, and some get really bent out of shape just thinking about it.

For some people, it's enough to make their skin crawl. And bathing won't wash them off. Known as the hair mite, the parasite lives in the hair follicles of people and feeds on oils, hormones, and fluids around the follicle. These itty-bitty bugs can initiate a variety of problems. When something causes the mites to reproduce at a higher rate, they can break out of the hair follicle and may hair loss, cause acne and various skin conditions. In some cases, the interaction with Demodex mites causes skin to actually slough off.

Studies show the Demodex hair mite to be associated with numerous types of skin complications. While mites may cause certain problems, it also is possible specific skin conditions become a breeding ground for Demodex mites. Besides, it's a major problem for dogs too. If you have high revels of hormones, you're going to have high levels of Demodex mite reproduction because these invertebrate insects obtain their steroids from the host.

Demodex hair mite poses the biggest threat to people under stress or those with cancer or other conditions such as HIV/AIDS that suppress the immune system. Demodex hair mite colonies can spread unchecked because patients cannot produce the antibodies needed to control the parasites. Under normal conditions, hair mites produce an antigen when they feed in a hair follicle, and then the human body makes antibodies against the parasites, thereby keeping their reproduction low and in balance.

Demodex hair mites feed continuously inside the hair follicle. Three to five days are required for egg laying and hatching, followed by one week for the larvae to develop into adults. Their total life span is around one to three months. They are transferred from host to host by contact, particularly in hair and face.

 

 

"Ungex Hair Mites Treatment"

• Scanning hair & scalp
• Microscope analysis
• Pro-Demodex Therapy
• Herbal solution
• Ozone therapy
• Eliminating hair mites
• Repairing weak hair roots
• Strengthening hair follicles
• Stimulating new hair growth
• Reducing infections
• Safe for all hair types and ages!

 

Other benefits of "Ungex Hair Mites Treatment"

• This therapy deeply cleanses hair follicles and scalp to prevent blockage and clogged oil in hair follicles, remove excess oil and balance sebaceous glands to eliminate Demodex hair mites and promote healthy hairs to solve hair loss without any side effect.

• This treatment is safe for all hair types and ages which incorporates pure essential oils to release stress from the scalp, relax and nourish scalp to prevent scalp aging.

• Maintain pH balance in the scalp. Improves dandruff problem effectively and absorption of nutrition to the scalp and individual hair cells and reduce graying of hair.

• Ungex presents professional products (herbal solution + ozone therapy) with computerized hair scanning analysis in a new breakthrough Pro-Demodex mites technology to eliminate parasites and germs, reducing infections on the scalp and continue with treatment to stop hair mites from growing.

• Ungex strengthen weak hair roots on scalp, improve hair density and stimulate new hair growth which can help male and female enterprise baldness sufferers to overcome their hair problems.

 

Demodex

Demodex folliculorum:
• The parasites frequently lie in pairs; they are elongated organisms with an obvious head-neck part and a body-tail part.
• They are covered by a cuticle surface. The body is mostly semi-transparent. The cuticle covering of body-tail part shows numerous striations. Head-neck part contains four pairs of short legs.
• High magnification of the head-neck part embedded in keratin-containing desquamated skin cells. The body-tail part in high magnification.

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Skin conditions aggravated by Demodex folliculorum:
To date, all research scientists have conducted has shown that when the Demodex folliculorum mite is associated with eruptions and erythema, the most irritated areas are through the central facial area or where there is the greatest abundance of sebaceous glands (T zone). In addition the higher incidence is the older client with a denser facial hair distribution.

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The eruptions are not always Rosacea, unless one uses the term to describe any form of permanent diffused redness that is graded 1-5. Many adult acne and peri-oral dermatitis conditions may be found to have an infestation of Demodex folliculorum and that instead of being a cause, are an aggravating factor. The itchy and irritation sensations, coming from an over proliferation of the mite, that is normally found in the pilosebaceous duct in fewer quantities.
A mite obtained from a case of demodicidosis in a patient with rosacea.

A study on Demodex folliculorum in rosacea:
A random sample of 16 female patients suffering from papulopustular rosacea (PPR) as well as (16) normal female healthy subjects as control group were adopted in this study to assess of Demodex folliculorum pathogenesis. It was done through determination of mite density using a standard skin surface biopsy 10.5 cm2 from different designated 6 areas on the face, and scanning electron microscopic study (SEM) as well as total IgE estimation.

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A trial of treatment using Crotamiton 10% cream with special program was also attempted. All subjects ranged between 35-55 years old. All patients with rosacea and 15 of the control group i.e. 75.93% were found to harbour mites. The mean mite counts by site distribution were 28.6 & 6.9 on the cheeks, followed by 14.5 & 3.0 on the forehead and lastly 6.8 & 0.8 on the chin in PPR and control groups respectively. The total mean mite count in patients was 49.9 initially and 7.9 after treatment. In the control group it was 10.7 & 10.6 respectively. The mean total IgE was 169.4 & 168.4 and 96.3 & 98.4 in PPR and control groups respectively.

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Light and scanning electron microscopy revealed that all mites were pointing in one direction. Some of them were containing bacteria inside their gut and on their skin. After treatment 3 cases (18.75%) were completely cured, 10 cases (62.5%) gave moderate response while 3 cases (18.75) have no response. In conclusion, this study supports the pathogenic role of Demodex folliculorum in rosacea.

Demodex is main cause of hair loss, skin aging, rough skin, wide pore, red nose, pimple, discoloration on the face, freckles, spot, fine wrinkles, atopic dermatitis, itching, skin disease, and etc.  Its thickness is ½ ~2/3 of human hair and average 0.28mm long.
It has 8 short and rough legs attached to the body and have elongated bottom part. It goes into follicles and lay eggs inside.
Demodex lives in sebum and absorb nutrition, water, and oxygen from cells and has high reproductive rate that after mating in 12 hours, female lays 50~60 eggs and it takes two weeks to develop into adults.


The total lifespan of a Demodex is 60~90 days and the dead mites decompose inside of the hair follicles.

Demodex mite causes our skin to have acne and uneven and rough skin texture along with the cornification.
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Demodex brevis:
Demodex brevis lives by nibbling on the gland cells.

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When Demodex brevis moves along the glands, goes in and out of the pore or walks on our skin, we feel itchiness.
Demodex takes over our skin and makes it their home. It turns our skin into rough just like a mole makes tunnel under the ground and makes uneven surface. Demodex also speeds up the aging process.

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The excrement of Demodex and dead Demodex make physical chemistry reaction with each other causing serious skin problems and cornification. It also destroys capillaries.

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The reason of having saggy skin is that the numerous pores on the skin get bigger and Demodex is the main reason of this.
If we compare Demodex with a hair, it is ½ to 2/3 of a hair thickness. This size of Demodex 7~8 of them are getting in and out of one pore. The pores are stretched out since the Demodex mites are moving back and forth, so our skin loses elasticity and gains more wrinkles.

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Also Demodex causes pigmentation. Melanin is the factor that decides skin color for each race.
When melanin can’t be decomposed then it shows on skin as black. White people can decompose this melanin so their skins show white.

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Asian can decompose Melanin in certain amount, so skin shows yellow color.
If pigmentation happens, that means epidermis does not work properly to decompose melanin. In the result, freckles and age spots will appear.

 

Morphology

• Adults - The size of demodice varies from 0.1 mm to 0.4 mm. Adult parasites have four pairs of short legs. They can slowly move on the skin especially during the night. Larvae, Nymphs - similar to adults, but larvae are 6-legged.
Life cycle (stages)

• Entire life cycle is spent on the host

• Females lay 50 to 60 eggs in the hair follicle

• Larvae and nymphs (protonymph, deutonymph) are swept by the sebaceous flow to the mouth of the follicle, where they mature

• Life cycle is completed in 18-24 days.

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Sites of infestation

• Lives around hair follicles or in the secretory ducts of sebaceous glands connected to the hair follicles of humans. The preferred sites are facial skin, forehead, cheeks, nose, wings, eyelashes and external ear channels.

• The incidence of demodicosis steadily increases with the individual's age. The infestation may be frequently free of symptoms. However, Demodicidosis is characterized by the presence of an erythematous rash mainly on the face and inflammation in acute and chronic forms may occur.

•  They are invisible to the eye unless aided by a microscope. The adult Demodex hair mites usually are 1/2 ~ 2/3 of human hair, around 0.3mm long.

• They have a semi-transparent elongated body with eight short segmented legs. Hair mites have pin-like mouth-parts for eating skin cells, hormones and oils. Also they absorb nutrition and oxygen from cells and have high reproductive rate.

• They can walk around on the skin, at a speed of 8 to 16 cm/hour especially at night.

 

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How to do we get rid of pigmentation is to regenerate epidermis to renew skin.
Most of people’s epidermis is filled with many polluted wastes, cosmetic waste and other substances that block the work of epidermis.


Demodex also fills the epidermis with laying 50~60 eggs and the eggs will be adults in two weeks.
After 60~90 days, Demodex dies and decays in the pore. This is also the reason of why the epidermis cannot work properly.

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Demodex lives in gland and eats the main ingredient of epidermis, Collagen and Elastin, destroys capillaries and finally promotes the early aging. Ultimately, epidermis has to work properly in order to get rid of the pigmentation. Otherwise, all the other treatment will be just temporary and have high possibility of recurrence.

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50% of Atopic dermatitis is caused by skin mites, Demodex. To find out the cause of allergy reactions to adult patient, they performed the patch test and 50% of them showed positive with Demodex.

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Demodex nibbles wall of hair root and consume the nutrition that is supposed to go to the hair root and this weakens the hair root.

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Also Demodex moves in and out of the skin repetitively and makes pore to be stretched out and cause infections to loss hair. Demodex walks with its claws so you will become scurfy and have itchiness together.
 

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New revolutionary solution to dermatology:
Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis, both frequently referred to as hair mites. Demodex canis lives on the domestic dog. Infestation with Demodex mites is common and usually does not cause any symptoms, although occasionally some skin diseases can be caused by the mites.

It is extremely rare to see a human infected with a different species of mite, such as Demodex canis, though a few instances have occurred. D. folliculorum was first described in 1842 by Simon; Demodex brevis was identified as separate in 1963 by Akbulatova. Demodex folliculorum is found in hair follicles, while Demodex brevis lives in sebaceous glands connected to hair follicles. Both species are primarily found in the scalp, face, near the nose, the eyelashes and eyebrows, but also occur elsewhere on the body.


The adult mites are only between 0.3 mm and 0.4 mm long, with D. brevis slightly shorter than D. folliculorum. They have a semi-transparent elongated body that consists of two fused segments. Eight short segmented legs are attached to the first body segment. The body is covered with scales for anchoring itself in the hair follicle, and the mite has pin-like mouth-parts for eating skin cells, hormones and oils (sebum) which accumulate in the hair follicles. The mites can leave the hair follicles and slowly walk around on the skin, at a speed of between 8 and 16 cm an hour—especially at night as they try to avoid light.

Female Demodex folliculorum are somewhat shorter and rounder than males. Both male and female Demodex mites have a genital opening, and fertilization is internal.

Mating takes place in the follicle opening, and eggs are laid inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands. The six-legged larvae hatch after 3–4 days, and it takes about seven days for the larvae to develop into adults. The total lifespan of a Demodex mite is several weeks. The dead mites decompose inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands.

Older people are much more likely to carry the mites; it is estimated that about 1/3 of children and young adults, 1/2 of adults, and 2/3 of elderly people carry the mites. The lower rate of children may be because children produce much less sebum. It is quite easy to look for one's own Demodex mites, by carefully removing an eyelash or eyebrow hair and placing it under a microscope.

The mites are transferred between hosts through contact of hair, eyebrows and of the sebaceous glands on the nose. Different species of animals host different species of Demodex; and Demodex is not contagious between different species.

In the vast majority of cases, the mites go unobserved, without any adverse symptoms, but in certain cases (usually related to a suppressed immune system, caused by stress or illness) mite populations can dramatically increase, resulting in a condition known as demodicosis or Demodex mite bite, characterised by itching, inflammation and other skin disorders. Blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelids) can also be caused by Demodex mites.


There is some evidence linking Demodex mites to some forms of the skin disease rosacea, possibly due to the bacterium Bacillus oleronius found in the mites.

Mites are small creatures visually similar to insects but with four pairs of legs instead of three. Many mites are parasites of animals and plants: Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are parasites of humans. These two microscopic mite species live on the face, tucked into the hair follicles. They are referred to as Demodex mites, follicle mites, hair mites or face mites.

Demodex mites and skin problems:
For years, follicle mites were thought to be commensals—parasites that live on us without doing any harm. Certainly, the majority of people who have them never know that they are there and suffer no adverse effects from them. Demodex folliculorum, however, can multiply to surprising numbers within one hair follicle—ten per follicle is not unheard of—and a large number of Demodex folliculorum mites seems to go along with skin problems, though this is by no means a reliable rule.

Over the years, considerable evidence has accumulated that Demodex folliculorum may at least play a role in certain skin conditions, particularly papulopustular rosacea. Patients with immunity problems, appear to be particularly susceptible. Symptomatic infestation with Demodex mites is called demodicidosis.

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More information about Demodex mites:

Demodex Brevis (oil gland)
male:0.165mm , female:0.208mm

Demodex Folliculorum (hair follicles)
male:0.219mm, female:0.294mm
They live in oil gland and hair follicles.


Lifespan: A few weeks to three months

Demodex is a genus of tiny parasitic mites that live in or near hair follicles of mammals.

About 65 species of Demodex mites are known.

Two species living on humans have been identified, Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis, both frequently referred to as hair mites.

D. folliculorum was first described in 1842 by Simon; D. brevis was identified as separate in 1963 by Akbulatova.
D. folliculorum is found in hair follicles, while D. brevis lives in sebaceous glands connected to hair follicles.


Both species are primarily found in the face, near the nose, the eyelashes and eyebrows, but also occur elsewhere on the body.
They have a semi-transparent elongated body that consists of two fused segments. Eight short segmented legs are attached to the first body segment.

The body is covered with scales for anchoring itself in the hair follicle, and the mite has pin-like mouth-parts for eating skin cells, hormones and oils (sebum) which accumulate in the hair follicles.

The mites can leave the hair follicles and slowly walk around on the skin, at a speed of between 8 and 16 cm an hour-especially at night as they try to avoid light.

Mating takes place in the follicle opening, and eggs are laid inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands.

The six-legged larvae hatch after 3–4 days, and it takes about seven days for the larvae to develop into adults.

The total lifespan of a Demodex Mite is several weeks to three months. The dead mites decompose inside the hair follicles or sebaceous glands.

Older people are much more likely to carry the mites; it is estimated that about 1/3 of children and young adults, 1/2 of adults, and 2/3 of elderly people carry the mites.

The Mites are transferred between hosts through upholstery items, contact of hair, eyebrows and of the sebaceous glands on the nose and etc.

In certain cases, usually related to a suppressed immune system, caused by stress or illness, mite populations can dramatically increase, resulting in hair loss as well as a condition known Demodex mite bite, characterised by itching, inflammation and other skin disorders.

It usually starts at middle age when the immune system is weakened and their population has increased.

One of the most obvious signs of the condition is a itching, crawling sensation on the scalp, but most of the time, there is no itching at all, and people are not aware they are infested with Demodex mites.

Tickling sensation on the scalp and face. This occurs most frequently on the lower nose, forehead and cheeks, especially in the evening and night.

This is the highest period of activity, usually when they mate. Many people are not aware of this tickle, because it starts gradually and it becomes an automatic reaction to scratch without noticing. You may have observed someone repeatedly scratching his face without realizing it.

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General information about Hair & Scalp Structure:

Cuticle, Cortex & Medulla
The hair is composed of a protein called keratin. The hair itself is arranged in three layers.

Inner Layer (medulla)
is a central zone of cells present only in large thick hair.

Middle layer (cortex)
is the main structure of the hair shaft, cortex determines the colour and hair texture of the hair affected by chemicals (bleach, perm, colouring)

Outer layer (cuticle)
tiny overlapping scales to protect cortex

Follicles, Sebaceous Gland, Blood Vessels & Dermal Papilla:

Follicle
located beneath the skin surface, whereby it holds the roots of hair. In one follicle, on average, there are 2-3 strands hair and is the point from which the hair grows.

Sebaceous Gland
Normally produces oil to moisturize the scalp. However, if the sebaceous gland is over-active, it will over produce too much of oil. This continuous process in long term will cause clogged follicles.

Blood Vessels
bring along the blood and nutrition to the hair roots to ensure good blood circulation, healthy and strong hair.

Dermal Papilla
The dermal papilla is situated at the base of the hair follicle. The dermal papilla Contain nerves and blood vessels which supply glucose for energy and amino acids to make keratin..

Now ... You should catch your Demodex mites!


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--------No hair mites, no hair loss!

--------Good luck and have a free Demodex day!

 

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THE INTERVIEW: "THE MYTH OF MITES"

The myth of mites

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